Unieście, 19-22 May 2016



Weronika Łaszkiewicz: Postmodern Dimensions of Medieval Fantasy Fiction: A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin


Izabela Dixon: The Arboreal Magic in A Song of Ice and Fire


Michał Różycki: Of Returning Dragons and the End of the World: The (In)Visibility of the Supernatural in George
R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire


Monika Drzewiecka: The Women of Ice and Fire


Sylwia Borowska-Szerszun: Neo-Medieval Misogyny in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire


Magdalena Bartoszek: The Myth of Chivalry: An Idealised Code of Behaviour Versus the Reality


Joanna Szwed: The Travels of Tyrion Lannister, or Medieval Travel Narratives and Their Reflections in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire


Carolyne Larrington: George R.R. Martin and Maurice Druon’s Les Rois Maudits ‘The Accursed Kings’


Barbara Kowalik: Excerpts from the Polish translation of Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur


Łukasz Neubauer: What’s in the Title?: Some Remarks on the Semantic Features of Kenning-like Titles in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire Series


Martyna Gibka: Functions of Characters’ Proper Names in A Game of Thrones


Anna Czarnowus: The (Non-)Medievalist Emotional Economy of George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire


Bartłomiej Błaszkiewicz: On the Motif of Katabasis in the Works of J.R.R. Tolkien and George R.R. Martin


Andrzej Wicher: George R.R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones as a Quasi-Historical Novel Inspired by the West European Middle Ages